Frequently Asked Questions

  1. I was recently diagnosed with cancer and would like to receive treatment at The Cancer Institute of New Jersey. What is the first step?
  2. What does The Cancer Institute of New Jersey provide that I might not find in my community?
  3. What do I bring with me on my first visit to The Cancer Institute of New Jersey?
  4. Who will be included in my treatment team?
  5. How will I know if my treatment regimen is considered standard therapy or a clinical trial?
  6. What is a clinical trial?
  7. Why do cancer patients choose to participate in clinical trials?
  1. I was recently diagnosed with cancer and would like to receive treatment at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. What is the first step?

    Simply call the New Patient Access Center at 732-235-8515 for adults and 732-235-7552 for pediatrics. You will be connected to one of our intake coordinators, who will promptly schedule an appointment for you.
     
  2. What does the Cancer Institute of New Jersey provide that I might not find in my community?

    The Cancer Institute of New Jersey offers many unique benefits:
  • The most current standard cancer treatments and an array of new therapies that may be unavailable through community practices.
     
  • A comprehensive approach to providing cancer care. Everything required by a patient for his or her diagnosis, treatment and recovery can be found at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. One visit provides access to a multidisciplinary team of specialists, at one location, thereby reducing your need for travel and multiple appointments.
     
  • A network of affiliated healthcare institutions in your community.
  1. What do I bring with me on my first visit to the Cancer Institute?

    First, you will need to arrive 30 minutes before your appointment to complete the necessary paper work.

    Second, we ask that you come prepared for your visit by bringing the following information with you: medical records (from other doctors and hospitals), x-rays (recent x-rays pertinent to your medical problem), pathology slides and reports, insurance cards, managed care referral (if applicable), your Social Security number (and spouse's, if insurance is in his/her name), completed registration forms, copy of living wll. When you make an appointment, you will also receive a confirmatory letter that lists what you need to bring.

    If you have any questions before your appointment, please call us at the New Patient Access Center at 732-235-8515 for adults and 732-235-7552 for pediatrics and ask to speak to the intake coordinator.
     
  2. Who will be included in my treatment team?

    One physician will be in charge of your care, with additional specialists as determined by the specific nature of your care needs. In addition, our oncology nurses, social workers and pharmacists, all of whom have defined expertise in the delivery of cancer care, will be part of your team.
     
  3. How will I know if my treatment regimen is considered standard therapy or a clinical trial?

    Every aspect of your treatment regimen will be discussed with you in great detail. You will be treated with conventional therapies, in such cases where they are known to be effective. In those cases where conventional therapies are known to be ineffective, you will be offered the opportunity to participate in a clinical trial investigating a novel therapy. You will be thoroughly informed regarding all potential benefits, risks, and side effects, and your treatment will be continuously monitored, to be certain this therapy is still the best course of treatment for your illness.
     
  4. What is a clinical trial?

    Before a new treatment is made available to the public, it must undergo a clinical trial. A clinical trial is a research term for a medical study with people. These studies test new drugs and other treatment options, where the results are unknown. These studies, strictly monitored and carefully evaluated, are performed in order to find a more effective way to treat a specific cancer. There are different types of clinical studies including preventive and diagnostic investigations, new treatment options, and studies that look at reducing side effects and improving quality of life.
     
  5. Why do cancer patients choose to participate in clinical trials?

    If you are one of the more than one million people diagnosed with cancer this year, you will want the best treatment available. A clinical trial offers the best available treatment and the opportunity to receive a new, and potentially more effective, therapy. Today, one out of two patients in the U.S. will survive their cancer. These 12 million survivors represent a significant increase in the rate of survival from the 1960s, when the average was one in three. New treatments from clinical trials can help further increase this rate.

Learn more about clinical trials.